1. Home
  2. Blog
  3. Planter 101- Guide to Choosing The Right Pot

Planter 101- Guide to Choosing The Right Pot

30 Nov 2022

 

After hours & hours of your inner gardener awakened, the next step to choosing the perfect plants for your dream home is selecting their complementary planters. Though the plants spread the aesthetics of the indoor space like no others, planters play a significant role in elevating the decor. A perfect planter complements your plants, helps in better growth, and turns any space from boring to eye-turning.

 

Now, before we get to the basics of planters, let us first talk about some basic know-before-you-buy tips!


POT VS PLANTER

Pot and Planter are two of the most commonly used phrases in the gardening world. While most of the time, they are used to indicate the same thing - a container to hold the plants, there is a very subtle difference between these. Pots are usually smaller, and round, and are designed to hold one plant, Planters work well as outer covers, can be irregular in shape, and can accommodate more than one plant. 

DOES SIZE MATTER?

When we talk about plants, we talk about them in sizes measured conveniently in cm or inches. And when the plant size come under consideration, it is only natural that the planter size is also taken into account. Now, this is very important because the size of your pot makes or breaks your plant. Maintaining a proper root-to-soil ratio is the mantra for a good and healthy plant.

DRAINAGE AND POROSITY!

Some planters come with drainage holes and some come without those. If you are a pro-gardener or working with succulents and Cactus, then you might be able to work with non-drainage hole planters. However, we always, always, recommend planters with drainage holes. Not only can you ensure that your plant is properly watered once the excess is seeping out of the pot, but it also greatly reduces the chances of root rot. A well-draining soil with a proper pot will ensure a smooth growth experience for both you and your plant in the long future. 

THE PLANTER SPECTRUM

Planters come in various sizes and materials - some organic (like Wood, Bamboo, Jute, etc) and other non-organic (like Fibreglass, Cement, Metal, etc). It is important to know which material suits your needs, since not only will it elevate your decor but also affect the health of the plant.

1. FIBREGLASS PLANTERS

Fiberglass is a fairly modern material. Glass is spun into a fiber and then mixed with a resin to create a strong and flexible composite, post which a few rounds of sanding and a layer of primer give the fiberglass planter a flawless and protective finish. This mixture is then molded into planter shapes. 

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

Find out our favourite Fiberglass Planters for all types of locations.

SHOP FIBREGLASS PLANTERS 

 

2. CONCRETE PLANTERS

Manufacturing Concrete Planters includes mixing cement paste with water, sand, and rock to create the final product. Industries use a combination of chemicals such as calcium, silicon, aluminum, and iron to help bind and harden the mixture. Wet concrete is poured into a mold for the final shape. Concrete comes in light grey colour, but you can use masonry paint and colour them in your desired colour.

Advantages:

Disadvantages: 

Check out our favourite Concrete Planters for all types of locations (many more concrete planters to be added soon).

SHOP CONCRETE PLANTERS 

3. PLASTIC PLANTER

Plastic has been a wonder material since it was introduced in the 1900s. Plastic pots are essentially made from crude oil which is a non-renewable resource. Despite that, large industries exist to extract and then process the oil needed to create plastic containers.

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

Add these High-Quality Plastic Pots for all types of locations.

SHOP PLASTIC PLANTERS 

 

4. TERRA COTTA AND CERAMIC POTS

Ceramic and TerraCotta are essentially the same material with slight variations in their mother composition - clay. While Terracotta is a reddish-brown clay, Ceramics are made of a lighter gray shade of clay. Ceramic is often glazed on the outside, while Terra cotta pots are left in their rustic appearance.

"Use glazed ceramic pots to keep your plants hydrated as the glazing seals the pot and stops leakage. On the other hand, unglazed terra cotta looks great and is well-suited for plants that like a lot of drainages."

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

5. METAL PLANTERS

There are various kinds of metal containers available, but the most common metals used are steel, aluminum, zinc, and copper. As an outdoor planter, metal containers made of steel rust over the years to become red in hue. This process is quickened by environmental elements like humidity and rainfall. Metal materials are not porous and so to ensure good drainage, drill holes in the bottom to allow drainage. 

"Galvanized steel is even stronger and will be more weather resistant compared to other planters in your container garden."

Advantages: 

Disadvantages:

Check out these stunning & exquisite Metal Planter collections.

SHOP METAL PLANTERS 

 

6. WOOD PLANTERS

Ergonomic and eco-friendly, wooden planters are your thing if you are looking for a sustainable garden. Rosewood, cedar, hemlock, fir, and pine are some of the most common tree wood used for these pots. Planks and beams are then cut from these trees to make lumber, post which they are cured and treated for several months to increase the waterproofing and strength of the pot.

Advantages: 

Disadvantages: 

Now that we know of the planter material, the main question, still remains unanswered:

WHICH PLANTER SHOULD I GO FOR

To put it simply, think about the kind of plant and location where you are growing it.

To put it simply, it all depends on what your style quota is and what look you are going for. If you ask us, we are absolutely hung up over FRP & Metal Planters - for their alluring, exquisite look and their lifelong durability.